Tired of misandry in the media

Khabeni

Registrant
There is so much covert and blatant misandry in the media, from romantic comdies, sitcoms and even commercials. Men are always betrayed as stupid, forgetful, and have to pander to women. This is why I don't like romantic comdies and most sitcoms. But even some commercials have misandry. It's hard to get away from. There's one where a man "forgets" something (ice) from the store and the wife gets annoyed, and of course the man is seen as the weak idiot. Why don't you go get it bitch? Maybe I'm just too sensitive. But being abused by most women in my life, sexually, physically and emotionally do you blame me? If misogynistic commercials and shows were as blatant as the misandry, feminists would have a field day. Why is misandry accepted and even encouraged? Whereas you can lose your job or even go to jail for misogyny. It just pisses me off.
 
It totally makes sense you'd see the world this way given your experience. Why would you trust women after all you've been through?

But if you want to work on healing, you could try to see women as just people. They're just people, just like we are, with all of the flaws that go with that.

I once hated women too. I got better. I really hate it when women accuse ALL men of being rapists and perps. I didn't want to be like that.
 

tommyb

Registrant
Um ... American culture treats as if you're one-hundred percent mentally healthy. It's really a compliment wrapped in super competitiveness. It's not going to go away. It's kind of like how a Drill Sergeant is treating like you're a man, on day one of Hell Week, a man who had the gall to put on that uniform, whom obviously hasn't earned it yet. There's going to be a lot of abuse, but really they're treating you with the height of respect. (Maybe that helps ...)

Maybe ...
 

ChristianR

Registrant
@Khabeni
I share parts of your history. By infecting 'their superiority' on you (with sick authority they Did Not deserve, in a game we Did Not know how to play, at a time We deserved genuine love, care, explination and support and not to be puppets of their perversion) they wished to install an inferiority in you. Please Brother, don't give them that power!

I feel your relation to misandry - but we are who we are - whether I associate with what the portray or not (and they ain't far off, LOL). But that do not make me weak nor anybody else superior.

Sorry for how you feel and emotions it generate seeing that. It's genuine and real and ligit. But don't let it own you for you and I and us must not loose touch with good people. That is what perps and perverts wanted to bestow on us back then.
 

Silverhand

Registrant
Once again, I mostly agree with Strangeways here, but I think your anger is totally valid. Seriously, I wouldn't tell you not be angry at the message (whether implicit or explicit) that you are inferior just because you are male. But just try to narrow the focus of that anger. It's not women generally who put that message out there, or who act on the message when they receive it.

In other words, don't blame the crowd such ads, movies, shows etc. believe are trying to pander to, just blame the people who think that's a good message to send and those who take it as an excuse to commit horrible acts.

Put even simpler, don't blame women generally, but do be pissed at the media professionals that push misandric content and the occasional fool that gets a very twisted takeaway from misandric messages.
 

Celtaf

Registrant
It totally makes sense you'd see the world this way given your experience. Why would you trust women after all you've been through?

But if you want to work on healing, you could try to see women as just people. They're just people, just like we are, with all of the flaws that go with that.

I once hated women too. I got better. I really hate it when women accuse ALL men of being rapists and perps. I didn't want to be like that.

The problem is that many women and men put up roadblocks to identifying bad behaviour in women. Either they deny that men and women both share bad behaviours (domestic violence conversations bring a good example) or when things are more particular to women (a tendency to assume that men should be able to read subtleties rather than being blunt and direct). Generally, the idea is that while men cause and are the instigators of demographic level problems, women are simply the victims of demographic problems. Even when it comes to child abuse, women don’t figure on the public conversation radar.

Women may be people, but the majority I’ve met see themselves as individuals, and men as blocs.And many men are content that this should be so too.
 

dark empathy

Registrant
I agree with Seltaff here.
The conversation is never about "individual men", or "individual women", it is always the societal evils or implicit failings of men, which are always portrayed as a persistent problem for all women everywhere!

Even on the rare occasions women are called out for bad behaviour, it is usually excused, often by blaming it ultimately on a man.

indeed, recently (fake Galadriel in the rings of power is a good example), it's getting to the point that actual negative traits, anger, bullish assertiveness, manipulation, coldness, are being lauded when they occur in women, there's even a campaign to remove the word "bossy", and replace it with women saying "I'm the boss", instead! :D.

It is true that this is not all women by a long way, and I've certainly run across women who actually hate this presentation of female aggression and domination of men as empowering, there are even women who see this as a direct attack on being "feminine", since there is very little room for any sort of traditional female or caring response in this portrayal .

However, it's a bit difficult to remember the normal women who speak out against this when the message is so very, very loud, and so very very triggering!

I struggle with it myself, and I'm married! To a woman who is actually sane and also hates this toxic femininity and misandry, so goodness knows how to cope without.

At the moment, I pretty much feel as I did during my abuse, just try not to think and wait until the angry, violent mob of women goes away, since that's pretty much all I can do!

Luke.
 
Actually I agree with you, @Celtaf - women don't have to worry about being painted as perps, ever, which is just part of the privilege of being female.

However, I guess the question for me is, is there a way we can discuss this that is conducive and not detrimental to our healing?

We can point out and discuss the fact that men are usually seen as perps and women are usually not seen as perps. If we can do this without rumination or anger, then there's no problem.

I can't do that. It makes me mad as hell - more or less, depending on my current level of dysregulation, and it makes me feel pretty powerless, since there's not very much I can do about it.

Some things I can do a lot to change, like my feelings of anger and my level of dysregulation. Some things I can't, like everyday misandry. So I try to default towards the things that are positive towards my healing, which are the things in my direct control.

I spent years ruminating on our society's misandry. When I realized I had to stop doing that, misandry still existed, but I was bitter and angry.

For me, I had to choose between rumination, bitterness, and anger, or healing. Others may be able to handle both. I learned that I really couldn't.
 
Judging individuals based on a group or groups they belong to because of how they were born or because of how/where they were raised is bigotry. Full stop. It sucks being on either side of that type of relationship. When we behave this way, and we all do to different degrees, we need to try and be aware of it, imho.

I'm not saying there is no value in analyzing how different societies conceive of these groups, and how those conceptions have positive or negative effects on them within a specific political/social/economic context. However we can't commit the simplistic and dangerous error of assuming that our analysis or understanding of a group's positioning with respect to other groups in that specific context explains or determines the behavior and character of the individuals that make up that group. This type of reductionist thinking is demonstrably false, intellectually lazy and potentially quite damaging even when it appears to support one's ideological preconceptions or past experiences.

We ALL fall into this kind of thinking. No one is immune to prejudice and bigotry. No one. When we discover these in ourselves, we can often learn a great deal by unpacking the assumptions and experiences behind them.

I don't really like writing in this cold, analytical style anymore, but I wanted to try to be as precise as possible and make it clear that I'm not putting anyone down.
 

Celtaf

Registrant
What I'm tired of is this: all concerns or complaints raised by men are considered some kind of ploy or whining unless it is actually complaining about other men. So, for example, gay men and trans people can complain about typical men, but men are told to man up and shut up if they talk about domestic abuse, childcare, CSA, or anything else except from acceptable victim profiling. There are, admittedly, a some women and men who will accept hearing about cases of male suffering as though they're freak accidents or shark attacks or something, but that's about it. So that's why we are all here, and why we don't have a special day or anything like that. I don't want a special day, though, I would just like to not have to pretend things are fine when they're not, 24/7,
 

Khabeni

Registrant
Thanks all for your replies. I'm usually not pissed off from the misandry, even some sitcoms are funny. But having to view the same minandrist commercials on streaming services all the time is not helpful. I've been told horrible things about my abuse that started when I was four. Like was my step mom hot? Or it's not as bad on me because I'm male. Or I was just getting lucky. And I was even told boys can't be molested. I don't and never have trusted women. Almosr every important woman in my life has been abusive. Step mother, mother, aunt, grandmother, ex-wife. I'm just tired. Tired of being seen as the bad guy. For some reason, I get approached by women almost everytime I go to a particular bar I like to go to. Usually it's to ask if I'll buy THEM a drink. I started to tell women in these situations I'm gay. Then we actually have a nice conversation without sexual tension. Do I give off some kind of "take advantage of me vibe?" I feel like that's all women do.
 

dark empathy

Registrant
@Induna, you are correct that prejudice in the literal sense, IE pre-justice, making a judgement on someone based on some pre-existing categorisation is never a good way to gain experience.

However, much of the problematic misandry which I and others take issue with here is based upon the fact that this is precisely what is being done to men.
Consider the alternate societal reactions between a woman making a misandric statement: EG "all men are pigs", and a man making an equivalent misogynist statement, EG "all women are manipulative bitches."

Even before we get into actual cultural critiques or observations, or into historical analyses of why these attitudes might have occurred, the plane, blatant treatment and indeed propagation of misandrist attitudes is pretty much a given, see the recent topic posted about face book comments, or hell pretty much most of pop culture created in the last 5 or 6 years.

The only difference is whether one calls it "misandry", or "female empowerment", (not to be confused with female equality), and the fact that women are permitted a voice, an opinion, while men are not.

There are then two related issues on top of the existing misandry directed at men, first, the fact that while women are encouraged to voice opinions about men and about themselves, men are only permitted one opinion, or one reading of a situation.

For example, I've read many commentaries by women on how in the traditional sleeping beauty fairy tale, sleeping beauty is an example of a woman being trapped in a passive, submissive roll, but such women always miss the fact that hundreds of princes according to the original fairy tale, die in the hedge of thorns attempting to reach her, while all beauty suffers is a prick on the finger and a long nap, because even if sleeping beauty is! an example of a passive submissive female character, the fairy tale also says that men are essentially disposable, and that having hundreds of men suffer a horrific death does not matter so long as the princess is safe.

This is not to say the passive reading of beauty is incorrect, only that it's intrinsically missing part of the story related to the nature of how men are percieved.
Yet, this is not a reading which I, or indeed other male fantasy writers or commentators are allowed! to make, since it is believed any suggestion that the traditionally masculine social view of men is anything but an empowered, privileged, patriarchal role, is something which is actively suppressed, or deemed as "misogynist."

Indeed the dark fantasy writer Joyce carrol oats recently noted how female dominated the publishing industry is, with over %70 of editors, and nearly %80 of agents being women who actively disregard anything sent to them by men (one reason my own life and career are on hold at the moment I think).

Then there is the second, emotive or psychological problem, the fact that men who've endured abuse from women can and do find this ridiculously triggering! Heck, during my own abuse I was regularly accused of being "insensative", of being a "Sexy beast", of not "understand what it was like to be a girl", these statements coming from the same girls who regularly left scratch marks on my genitals and slapped my own sperm in my face.

That psychological problem is frankly, bloody difficult to deal with, when you turn on the radio and here yet another advert for a domestic violence hotline, in which a woman is encouraged to tell her female friend enduring domestic violence to call, with no suggestion that men are anything but abusers.

It's difficult! It's triggering! It's Hard! it's Frustrating! it causes Anger and feelings of powerlessness!

I suspect until I can! feel like I'm actually having some power over my life, getting my voice heard, doing something practically useful with the fucking qualification which took me 12 years to get! It's probably not going to stop!

That's why this is a difficult subject, on both a purely interlectual, and yes, emotional level.
I'd love! to just ignore it, I'd love to say "bugger it", and move on, I'd love to follow the sarenity prayer and learn to "change the things I can change", but when your stuck unable to change or do anything, then there's not a lot to be done!

Sorry for the ramble, but really this is something I struggle with quite a lot myself.

Luke.
 

Celtaf

Registrant
@dark empathy there have been people who criticized the passivity of women in traditional folktales, and yes, they never addressed the disposibility of the men. I've heard people complaining that women are seen as objects, as mere rewards for the men, while completely disregarding the fact that men are only valued if they manage to accomplish the necessary deeds to be proven worthy. But then that's what every romance novel is like; the main body of the men are clowns, villains, fools, sidekicks, and only ONE man is worthy of the woman's attention. Female writers have not produced much of an alternative to this.
 
@Induna, you are correct that prejudice in the literal sense, IE pre-justice, making a judgement on someone based on some pre-existing categorisation is never a good way to gain experience.

However, much of the problematic misandry which I and others take issue with here is based upon the fact that this is precisely what is being done to men.
Consider the alternate societal reactions between a woman making a misandric statement: EG "all men are pigs", and a man making an equivalent misogynist statement, EG "all women are manipulative bitches."

Even before we get into actual cultural critiques or observations, or into historical analyses of why these attitudes might have occurred, the plane, blatant treatment and indeed propagation of misandrist attitudes is pretty much a given, see the recent topic posted about face book comments, or hell pretty much most of pop culture created in the last 5 or 6 years.

The only difference is whether one calls it "misandry", or "female empowerment", (not to be confused with female equality), and the fact that women are permitted a voice, an opinion, while men are not.

There are then two related issues on top of the existing misandry directed at men, first, the fact that while women are encouraged to voice opinions about men and about themselves, men are only permitted one opinion, or one reading of a situation.

For example, I've read many commentaries by women on how in the traditional sleeping beauty fairy tale, sleeping beauty is an example of a woman being trapped in a passive, submissive roll, but such women always miss the fact that hundreds of princes according to the original fairy tale, die in the hedge of thorns attempting to reach her, while all beauty suffers is a prick on the finger and a long nap, because even if sleeping beauty is! an example of a passive submissive female character, the fairy tale also says that men are essentially disposable, and that having hundreds of men suffer a horrific death does not matter so long as the princess is safe.

This is not to say the passive reading of beauty is incorrect, only that it's intrinsically missing part of the story related to the nature of how men are percieved.
Yet, this is not a reading which I, or indeed other male fantasy writers or commentators are allowed! to make, since it is believed any suggestion that the traditionally masculine social view of men is anything but an empowered, privileged, patriarchal role, is something which is actively suppressed, or deemed as "misogynist."

Indeed the dark fantasy writer Joyce carrol oats recently noted how female dominated the publishing industry is, with over %70 of editors, and nearly %80 of agents being women who actively disregard anything sent to them by men (one reason my own life and career are on hold at the moment I think).

Then there is the second, emotive or psychological problem, the fact that men who've endured abuse from women can and do find this ridiculously triggering! Heck, during my own abuse I was regularly accused of being "insensative", of being a "Sexy beast", of not "understand what it was like to be a girl", these statements coming from the same girls who regularly left scratch marks on my genitals and slapped my own sperm in my face.

That psychological problem is frankly, bloody difficult to deal with, when you turn on the radio and here yet another advert for a domestic violence hotline, in which a woman is encouraged to tell her female friend enduring domestic violence to call, with no suggestion that men are anything but abusers.

It's difficult! It's triggering! It's Hard! it's Frustrating! it causes Anger and feelings of powerlessness!

I suspect until I can! feel like I'm actually having some power over my life, getting my voice heard, doing something practically useful with the fucking qualification which took me 12 years to get! It's probably not going to stop!

That's why this is a difficult subject, on both a purely interlectual, and yes, emotional level.
I'd love! to just ignore it, I'd love to say "bugger it", and move on, I'd love to follow the sarenity prayer and learn to "change the things I can change", but when your stuck unable to change or do anything, then there's not a lot to be done!

Sorry for the ramble, but really this is something I struggle with quite a lot myself.

Luke.
Luke,

I have read many of your posts over the last couple of months and so I understand that you are in a difficult and very frustrating situation. I have zero patience with the arrogant, short-sighted, narcissistic, and intellectually lazy fashion that is "wokeism" and "cancel culture". It is profoundly offensive for a multitude of reasons, but primarily because it is extremely dangerous to any civil society. The simplistic conflation of Men, or worse a man, with Patriarcal culture, as if our entire lives and choices are determined by an ideological construct, is as offensive as it is idiotic. We agree completely on this, as do many others both men and women from all sides of the political spectrum. I am personally thrilled that I do not live in North America or Europe (I include GB in Europe being originally from the US) because I don't have to hear nonsense like that very often where I live. Being a survivor of sexual abuse by women must make this profoundly painful.

I want to advise you to find some way to fight this in your daily life, even if it is a small way, but I don't know what it's like in your shoes so it would be arrogant of me. I don't believe we have to accept a gag order given by idiots. I don't believe we should. Your story is compelling, as is your current situation. Maybe it is worth seeking a wider audience for it? Even if the audience ends up being very small, it might bring you some joy. I hope I'm not being being an asshole here. I don't mean to be.
 

dark empathy

Registrant
@Seltaf, you are correct, however my point here wasn't just related to the criticism itself, but the fact that men are not allowed to address or question views of men or depictions of men put forward throughout history. Even prior to this particular era, the field of "masculine critique", was not held to be one of serious critique or thought.

Partly this was because it was assumed that "man", was a sort of default baseline, and so you couldn't necessarily criticise what was taken as standard, and partly it was because nearly all discourse about gender and gender differences, even going back to the 1920's, has been exclusively female centric.

For example, pick any study of sexual differences you like, and the results are always framed as "women are more compassionate", or "women are less aggressive", focusing entirely upon how women differ from; and usually surpass the baseline which is assumed to be men.

Again, ask why say a film like Thelma and Louise, is never called "misandrist", even though every male character in it is either a fool or a rapist, and that was even before this current era where the only correct attitude for men is held to be "admitting their privilege", or "supporting women."

@Induna, thanks for the encouragement, I was just trying to clarify things a little here.

I'm pretty stuck at the moment for doing anything, since the two tallents I have, writing and on stage performing go no where.
Both are controlled by small cliques of powerful people, usually (in the case of publication), powerful women, which means a no go area from what I've gathered, since I'm tired of begging and getting rejected.

I've considered self-publishing, but you need to be waaaaaay better at social media and online promotion than I am to make a go of that.

that's why I generally feel powerless, even with small things.

My lady said to me the other day that five years ago, she thought of me as a problem solver, someone who could usually think of a way around things, these days, I've just found that's something that has died in me.

Even in computer games, where previously I'd try something for hours until I got through, now I just don't have the patience anymore.

I just feel currently I have no future and no way of getting one, indeed it's just my lady whose keeping me here, something she's actually aware of and also worried about, given the cancer.

That's why I find misandry triggering, it's just another reminder that just as during my abuse, there is nothing at all I can do to change my situation but wait until the bitches leave me alone.

Yes, this is learned helplessness, my lady's noticed and said as much, but again, I just need something! to go right for once.

anyway, sorry for the rant, it's half past three in the morning and I probably should stop.

Luke.
 

Celtaf

Registrant
@dark empathy it's hard to have ambition these days if you are not utterly driven, because generally men or boys are so often told they take up too much space and their achievements are just the results of patriarchy. But let's be honest: most people are stupid. So feminists cannot think that them having a chance to compete doesn't mean that they WILL succeed, just means that they have the CHANCE to succeed. As a result, they have pushed the idea that men succeed due to unfairness. For an empathic person, it is hard to accept this, and when this view is pushed it sticks rather than just being "a feminist complaint" that you put in a box and forget about.

What has to be done of course, is to accept that while the basic premise of feminism (equality of men and women in economic and political matters) is reasonable, the way it is carried out often isn't, and that a lot of feminists want to hear people agree with whatever is popular regardless of whether it makes sense or not. It is a form of public piety, not something well thought out. It should not get in the way of you trying to make your life better.

I'm sure you have no intention of treating women badly or unfairly, and have no need to have constant second thoughts and self doubts about yourself because it amuses many feminists to try to make men feel anxious. You can be a perfectly decent person and live your life. You have every right to do this. You were badly mistreated yourself, and I'm sure the idea of mistreating others is an awful thought to you. There are, unfortunately, lots of people out there who are narrow minded and selfish and don't really care about others, but just want to seem so. That is the average feminist because that is the average person.

What you need, as all of us need, is to see yourself as a person who deserves the chance to try to have a decent life, to be around people who care about you and treat you well and respect you. Life is hard enough as it is without all that, and is even harder living in the shadow of abuse.
 

dark empathy

Registrant
@Seltaf, Feminism might have started as a quest for social and economic equality, but that is not where it is now, especially the mainstream anger fuelled "me too", variety, which has more in common with pitchfork carrying mobs than careful social critique. Indeed,this era of changing "problematic", material and literally censoring books is disturbingly dogmatic, for all it's often done in the name of "diversity", (obviously not diversity of outlook or opinion).

Yes, part of my adverse reaction to the modern portrayal of men is that I spent far too long believing I was! an abuser and refuse to get back into that box, however there's a bit more too it than that.

As an undergraduate, I was almost blocked from doing a masters by an insane feminist lecturer who sued the department, my phd was rejected at the last minute by an insane feminist marker who insisted I literally rewrite the entire thing from scratch including a lot of her ideas not my own. Indeed, this was super ironic since one of her major objections was my belief that profoundly learning disabled children must! be included in discussion of disability as the most vulnerable disabled people there are, and her firm belief that I was incorrect, ----- a child hating feminist if I ever saw one.

The issue at the moment is that I have actually done! the work required to be successful, I spent 12 years getting the phd, including the rewrites and ptsd and everything else, the problem is I've now found when actually trying to get anywhere with anything else it means bugger all because guess what? I've got all this straight white male privilege!

Never mind that I happen to belong to a literal invisible minority, nevermind that people tend to pretend I literally do not exist, I'm the one who must have his work rejected and step back because people are looking for: "female voices", or "voices of minorities!"

This is the problem.

I would never hurt anyone male or female, indeed I spend a lot of time taking care of my wife; and during the cancer was doing this on a very physical, often intimate level, but I freely admit I do get dam tired of always being the beggar, the one on the outside, the one who is asking for favours, a state I'm in pretty constantly.

All I really want is some degree of appreciation, some degree of acceptance, some feeling that I'm actually reaching someone or making a small difference, that's all, I don't exactly think that is wanting too much, though in my case it seems it is, ---- oh well I've always got all this lovely "male privilege", to fall back on.

This is another reason I tend to feel jealous of women, since even before this era, women would get validation for simply existing, and of course now, any woman has an instant source of pride and belonging simply by virtue of what she was born with.
Indeed, this seems to be much of the modern woke philosophy, that it is not what a person does! but what a person is which is important, and as someone who has tried to do! things despite! losing out in the genetic lottery I rather resent this position.

I don't even have to be super successful, (though making enough money to actually support two people would be nice), just some degree of making some sort of difference would be enough.

Back in 2014, during an abortive six month counselling course (which ended up being three months short due to my counsellor moving on), he actually straight off told me that he thought if I had what I had briefly as an undergraduate, a community who accepted me for what I did, I'd be fine, that in my case much of the trouble really is! the rest of the world, and that was before the "me victim", era when insane feminists went from a minority to running everything!

Never mind, I've promised my lady that long as she needs me I'll be here, and that will have to be enough until the wind changes, and if it doesn't change, well I have no future now, so no future in the future can't matter at this point, and hay at least with me out of the way some poor pathetic pretty woman will get the chance to spout her hate speak, which is obviously just what the world needs more of right now.

(slow ironic hand clap).

AnywayLuke.
 

Celtaf

Registrant
@dark empathy when I was at university, I had written a paper for history that was about how the involvement of men was necessary to make suffragette activism in Canada be effective. I had written about the Famous Five, who were the most famous Canadian leaders of suffragism, and how in particular Emily Murphy, who was Canada’s first female magistrate, had particularly fought against the policy at the time that women could have no part as lawyers, judges or juries. I had, however, observed that the positive responses of the Attorney-General of Alberta, and, ultimately, the Lord Chancellor of Great Britain (Canada being a Domion at that time) had been vital in making the activism successful.

I had to fight fir a good grade. The TA in particular profoundly disliked my paper, and her only takeaway was that I had said that women could not succeed without men. The prof argued that I had not provided strong proof, and I had to point out that I had provided examples but also citations that demonstrated that from the time of that Famous Five case to the 1960s, Canada had had only one female MP, and yet a few dozen laws had given increasing autonomy to women. This, I argued, was very effective activism, because people with no legal power had changed laws entirely through influencing others who did have the power. I managed to raise my grade slightly.

I can also recall how feminists I knew reacted to the Jordan Peterson interview with Cathy Newman. While people who respected Peterson thought he responded very well, feminists I knew simply thought he had avoided answering her questions and was very rude to her. I asked if they had not noted that he strongly approved of women who were successful, and encouraged them in his practice to be so, and they didn’t notice that.

There is a broad movement that has been going on for some time, that is not really intelligent but very cunning, that has developed language that affirms pre-established notions of what is good and right. Feminism is one of these.
 

Silverhand

Registrant
@dark empathy when I was at university, I had written a paper for history that was about how the involvement of men was necessary to make suffragette activism in Canada be effective. I had written about the Famous Five, who were the most famous Canadian leaders of suffragism, and how in particular Emily Murphy, who was Canada’s first female magistrate, had particularly fought against the policy at the time that women could have no part as lawyers, judges or juries. I had, however, observed that the positive responses of the Attorney-General of Alberta, and, ultimately, the Lord Chancellor of Great Britain (Canada being a Domion at that time) had been vital in making the activism successful.

I had to fight fir a good grade. The TA in particular profoundly disliked my paper, and her only takeaway was that I had said that women could not succeed without men. The prof argued that I had not provided strong proof, and I had to point out that I had provided examples but also citations that demonstrated that from the time of that Famous Five case to the 1960s, Canada had had only one female MP, and yet a few dozen laws had given increasing autonomy to women. This, I argued, was very effective activism, because people with no legal power had changed laws entirely through influencing others who did have the power. I managed to raise my grade slightly.
I think this sort of thing has more to do with human nature and confirmation bias than anyone one movement. Generally, we all tend to believe information that confirms are pre-existing beliefs and disbelieve information that conflicts with those assumptions. Some teaching professionals let that spill-over into how they grade. They assume that work that supports their view must have been done correctly, but research or a thesis that contradicts them must be flawed.

Speaking from my own college experience (I'm from the U.S.), I had something similar happen to me in a class on public policy. My research was on gun control policies, and used crime statistics from years when certain laws were in effect and compared them to years without those restrictions to see if statistically significant changes in gun crime could be observed. Some policies showed statistically significant effects, but some did not. However, one policy that was popular with gun control advocates landed in the no effects pile and the professor along with the rest of the audience was furious. I got a C because my methods were clearly too unsophisticated and my results were biased.

Two weeks later my professor reaches out. A well respected statistician in the field published similar study using the same methods of statistical analysis, but came to a different result. He began to reconsider his assumptions about my methodology, and said he'd regrade my work if I included an update to address the statistician's new work. It turned out we used the same formula but different data, his came from news archives (which means he only had the incidents that someone thought were newsworthy) while I was using FBI crime statistics. I ended up getting an A.

Sorry for the long anecdote, but the moral of the story is that it is an unfortunate part of human nature to get stuck in our beliefs and react negatively towards anything that challenges them.
 

Celtaf

Registrant
I think this sort of thing has more to do with human nature and confirmation bias than anyone one movement. Generally, we all tend to believe information that confirms are pre-existing beliefs and disbelieve information that conflicts with those assumptions. Some teaching professionals let that spill-over into how they grade. They assume that work that supports their view must have been done correctly, but research or a thesis that contradicts them must be flawed.

Speaking from my own college experience (I'm from the U.S.), I had something similar happen to me in a class on public policy. My research was on gun control policies, and used crime statistics from years when certain laws were in effect and compared them to years without those restrictions to see if statistically significant changes in gun crime could be observed. Some policies showed statistically significant effects, but some did not. However, one policy that was popular with gun control advocates landed in the no effects pile and the professor along with the rest of the audience was furious. I got a C because my methods were clearly too unsophisticated and my results were biased.

Two weeks later my professor reaches out. A well respected statistician in the field published similar study using the same methods of statistical analysis, but came to a different result. He began to reconsider his assumptions about my methodology, and said he'd regrade my work if I included an update to address the statistician's new work. It turned out we used the same formula but different data, his came from news archives (which means he only had the incidents that someone thought were newsworthy) while I was using FBI crime statistics. I ended up getting an A.

Sorry for the long anecdote, but the moral of the story is that it is an unfortunate part of human nature to get stuck in our beliefs and react negatively towards anything that challenges them.
Everything that you are saying is true. It can certainly happen with any group. The problem is that feminists pretend they’re fine, and that only people who want to deny equality to women would ever raise concerns or question them.
 
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