Keep Quiet

stmst

New Registrant
Good afternoon, all. This might sound like an odd question, but I thought I’d throw it out there. Has anyone who’s ever been assaulted/harassed by their immediate manager or supervisor been told to keep quiet regarding the assault/harassment by a department head or director? I experienced sexual assault as well as months of sexual harassment from my immediate, female supervisor and, as a precautionary measure, was reassigned to a new supervisor. I was told by my deputy director (my former supervisor’s boss) to tell people, if they asked, I was reassigned for different reasons rather than why I was really assigned. She literally coached me on how to frame my answer and advised me to steer away from telling people why I was really reassigned. I was taken aback by this. I feel as though my deputy director is protecting the assailant rather than the victim. Any constructive feedback will be greatly appreciated.
 

Ceremony

Moderator
Staff member
Good afternoon, all. This might sound like an odd question, but I thought I’d throw it out there. Has anyone who’s ever been assaulted/harassed by their immediate manager or supervisor been told to keep quiet regarding the assault/harassment by a department head or director? I experienced sexual assault as well as months of sexual harassment from my immediate, female supervisor and, as a precautionary measure, was reassigned to a new supervisor. I was told by my deputy director (my former supervisor’s boss) to tell people, if they asked, I was reassigned for different reasons rather than why I was really assigned. She literally coached me on how to frame my answer and advised me to steer away from telling people why I was really reassigned. I was taken aback by this. I feel as though my deputy director is protecting the assailant rather than the victim. Any constructive feedback will be greatly appreciated.

Hello stmst,

Are you familiar with what the EEOC is? There is valuable information in that link, where you can educate yourself about what's going on. There will be a need for you to carefully examine definitions of terms.

I studied these when I became a store manager some years ago, but it was a brochure on the staff wall. There has been one report in my career where I was informed. It was let go by the person reporting, because they chose to quit. The longer I work there, the more I regret she left. I am not saying you are better off being in the vicinity of that perpetrator supervisor. That was a serious violation. One which, that deputy director is required to report to her H.R. head. If she didn't you have some choices to make. Documentation will be vital, but I'm not advising you. You would be best served by finding an advocate, and hopefully one who is experienced with EEOC filings, H.R. Dept requirements, non-disclosure agreements and the like. I have studied that web site, and also many issues around Title IX regarding College and University campus sexual assault reporting issues.

There's a lot to learn, and I'm not suited to advise. I'm sharing information, not advise. These things I write are for information only. I hope it's useful.
 
I feel as though my deputy director is protecting the assailant rather than the victim
How sad this is the way things seem to go hide the perpetrators and keep it quiet. So wrong

I am sorry for what you have been through. Work places need to set up and protect the employee's.

Take good care
 
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